Exercise: Writing about others’ research

Like this post, this writing also comes from an exercise I did at a science communication seminar with Katherine Kornei. We were given resources pertaining to this study, which found that mice who are deaf at birth make the same vocalizations as mice who hear from birth. This means that in mice, unlike in humans, theContinue reading “Exercise: Writing about others’ research”

Exercise: Writing about your research

At a science communication seminar at OMSI on April 21st, I participated in several science writing exercises with science writer Katherine Kornei. This assignment was to write an article about our research with a particular publication in mind. This piece was written for Wired. Audience [Wired] Headline (an attention-grabbing statement): Bounce at Will Subhead (expands onContinue reading “Exercise: Writing about your research”

What does my knit sweater have in common with an avalanche?

Avalanches don’t just happen on mountains! Scientists use the concept of an “avalanche” to describe other phenomena that evolve in similar ways, such as forest fires, a stock market crash, or solar flares. In a recent paper released on arXiv, French physicists made the argument that knit fabrics also behave in this “avalanche” fashion. ThisContinue reading “What does my knit sweater have in common with an avalanche?”

Blood of Komodo dragons could provide antibiotic alternative

(Note: I initially wrote this piece for a workshop at ComSciCon-PNW 2017) In January of 2017, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a much more frightening Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report than usual: a woman in Nevada had perished from a bacterial infection that no antibiotic in America could fight. Doctors administeredContinue reading “Blood of Komodo dragons could provide antibiotic alternative”